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MIOCA IN THE NEWS

Please see our news in the archive to the right.

Olaparib shows improvement in PFS but not OS, So Far

March 30, 2012

Olaparib, a PARP inhibitor, showed a 3.6 month improvement in progression free survival (PFS) in women with platinum sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer. However, based on the interim analsis, there is no significant improvement in overall survival. PARP inhibitors are presumed to work particularly well for patients with a BRCA mutation, however BRCA status was not required for enrollment in this trial.See full article <link href="http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1105535?query=featured_hematology-oncology&">here</link>

Olaparib, a PARP inhibitor, showed a 3.6 month improvement in progression free survival (PFS) in women with platinum sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer. However, based on the interim analsis, there is no significant improvement in overall survival. PARP inhibitors are presumed to work particularly well for patients with a BRCA mutation, however BRCA status was not required for enrollment in this trial.See full article <link href="http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1105535?query=featured_hematology-oncology&">here</link>

Patient Advocates Encouraged That Ovarian Cancer Trial Will Advance, Thanks to FDA Approval to Re-Import Doxil®

March 19, 2012

Washington, DC—Endocyte, Inc. announced today that is has received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to re-import supplies of Doxil® from Europe for use in the company’s PROCEED Phase 3 trial. The PROCEED trial is a clinical trial for women with folate-receptor positive platinum resistant ovarian cancer. Enrollment in the trial had stopped due to the ongoing, worldwide shortage of Doxil. More information about the PROCEED trial is available at <link href="%20http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01170650">www.clinicaltrials.gov</link>.

Study Argues for Increased Use of PARP Inhibitors

March 18, 2012

A study from the Oregon Health &amp; Science University suggests that women who have a recurrence of ovarian cancer would benefit from PARP inhibitors, now being tested in women with hereditary ovarian cancer. The study enrolled women with non-hereditary ovarian cancer, also called sporadic ovarian cancer. The women who had a recurrence were more likely to have certain genetic mutations, including PARP mutations. This suggests that more women than just those with a BRCA mutation would benefit from treatment with a PARP inhibitor.Read the abstract <link href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0030042">here</link><emphasize>reprinted from OCNA</emphasize>

A study from the Oregon Health &amp; Science University suggests that women who have a recurrence of ovarian cancer would benefit from PARP inhibitors, now being tested in women with hereditary ovarian cancer. The study enrolled women with non-hereditary ovarian cancer, also called sporadic ovarian cancer. The women who had a recurrence were more likely to have certain genetic mutations, including PARP mutations. This suggests that more women than just those with a BRCA mutation would benefit from treatment with a PARP inhibitor.Read the abstract <link href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0030042">here</link>
<emphasize>reprinted from OCNA</emphasize>