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MIOCA IN THE NEWS

Please see our news in the archive to the right.

Metformin may increase ovarian cancer survival

December 21, 2012

A retrospective, case-control study at Mayo Clinic, found the diabetes drug metformin may increase survival in women with ovarian cancer. It reported that ovarian cancer patients with diabetes taking metformin during treatment had a 4 times greater 5-year survival rate, compared to non-diabetic ovarian cancer patients not taking the drug. <link href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22183212">Abstract here</link>.

Supreme Court to hear case against BRCA1 & BRCA2 patents

December 5, 2012

The Supreme Court will hear arguments challenging the patents of 2 genes associated with breast and ovarian cancer - the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations, which are currently owned by Myriad Laboratories. The lawsuit charges the patents stifle diagnostic testing and research that could lead to cures and limit a woman’s medical options. The Alliance has joined the suit; the ACLU and Public Patent Foundation first filed it in 2009.

Tell Congress to prevent harmful cuts to ovarian cancer programs

November 30, 2012

If Congress does not act soon, we will see across-the-board cuts to programs that are crucial to fighting ovarian cancer. These automatic cuts, called sequestration, will decimate programs that play an essential role in research to fight and prevent ovarian cancer. Read more about what you can do.

Survey to help Influence Future Ovarian Cancer Research

August 7, 2012

The Ovarian Cancer National Alliance is partnering with the Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) on a first-of-its-kind survey for women with ovarian cancer. Your input will help the Alliance and SGO better understand the patient perspective on outcomes from clinical research and could help shape future research.

We urge all ovarian cancer survivors to click here to complete the short survey. We want to know which endpoints are meaningful to you, and what impact various side effects have on your quality of life. This information could influence how ovarian cancer drugs are evaluated, approved and covered in the future.

Higher Social Attachments Associated with Survival Advantage in Women with Ovarian Cancer

July 20, 2012

According to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, women with ovarian cancer that have high levels of emotional support live longer than women that do not. The study also suggests that a high degree of “instrumental social support” – that is, reflecting the availability of tangible assistance – did not have any effect on survival.

Michigan Ranked 28th in US on Provision of Care to Ovarian Cancer Patients

June 30, 2012

<header level="4">First-of-Its-Kind Report Card Evaluates All 50 States and District of Columbia </header>The Ovarian Cancer National Alliance released a report identifying four categories essential for quality care for women with ovarian cancer. It ranks all 50 states and the District of Columbia on their provision of such care. Michigan was ranked 28th overall, based on the environment it provides for women with ovarian cancer. Ovarian Cancer: A Call for State Action urges legislators and advocates to work together on improving care for women with ovarian cancer in their communities. 

<header level="4">First-of-Its-Kind Report Card Evaluates All 50 States and District of Columbia </header>The Ovarian Cancer National Alliance released a report identifying four categories essential for quality care for women with ovarian cancer. It ranks all 50 states and the District of Columbia on their provision of such care. Michigan was ranked 28th overall, based on the environment it provides for women with ovarian cancer. Ovarian Cancer: A Call for State Action urges legislators and advocates to work together on improving care for women with ovarian cancer in their communities. 

Supreme Court Ruling Ensures Healthcare Coverage for Women with Ovarian Cancer

June 29, 2012

The decision on the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act, upholds many critical patient protections. It means that women with ovarian cancer will continue to benefit from the elimination of lifetime and annual benefit limits and prohibitions on denying coverage due to pre-existing conditions. More about how this decision benefits women with ovarian cancer and their families can be found here.

NCCN PUBLISHES NEW TREATMENT GUIDELINES

April 6, 2012

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) just published three updated ovarian cancer guidelines. The guidelines are based on research evidence from clinical trials and other studies. They are developed by oncologists from an alliance of twenty-one highly respected cancer centers and are one component of a physician’s treatment recommendations for a patient.The NCCN guidelines also can affect insurers’ decisions about coverage. Women with ovarian cancer should be aware of the just published changes as they may result in adjustments to insurance coverage. See more <link href="http://http://www.mioca.org/news">here</link>:

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) just published three updated ovarian cancer guidelines. The guidelines are based on research evidence from clinical trials and other studies. They are developed by oncologists from an alliance of twenty-one highly respected cancer centers and are one component of a physician’s treatment recommendations for a patient.The NCCN guidelines also can affect insurers’ decisions about coverage. Women with ovarian cancer should be aware of the just published changes as they may result in adjustments to insurance coverage. See more <link href="http://http://www.mioca.org/news">here</link>:

Olaparib shows improvement in PFS but not OS, So Far

March 30, 2012

Olaparib, a PARP inhibitor, showed a 3.6 month improvement in progression free survival (PFS) in women with platinum sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer. However, based on the interim analsis, there is no significant improvement in overall survival. PARP inhibitors are presumed to work particularly well for patients with a BRCA mutation, however BRCA status was not required for enrollment in this trial.See full article <link href="http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1105535?query=featured_hematology-oncology&">here</link>

Olaparib, a PARP inhibitor, showed a 3.6 month improvement in progression free survival (PFS) in women with platinum sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer. However, based on the interim analsis, there is no significant improvement in overall survival. PARP inhibitors are presumed to work particularly well for patients with a BRCA mutation, however BRCA status was not required for enrollment in this trial.See full article <link href="http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1105535?query=featured_hematology-oncology&">here</link>

Patient Advocates Encouraged That Ovarian Cancer Trial Will Advance, Thanks to FDA Approval to Re-Import Doxil®

March 19, 2012

Washington, DC—Endocyte, Inc. announced today that is has received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to re-import supplies of Doxil® from Europe for use in the company’s PROCEED Phase 3 trial. The PROCEED trial is a clinical trial for women with folate-receptor positive platinum resistant ovarian cancer. Enrollment in the trial had stopped due to the ongoing, worldwide shortage of Doxil. More information about the PROCEED trial is available at <link href="%20http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01170650">www.clinicaltrials.gov</link>.

Study Argues for Increased Use of PARP Inhibitors

March 18, 2012

A study from the Oregon Health &amp; Science University suggests that women who have a recurrence of ovarian cancer would benefit from PARP inhibitors, now being tested in women with hereditary ovarian cancer. The study enrolled women with non-hereditary ovarian cancer, also called sporadic ovarian cancer. The women who had a recurrence were more likely to have certain genetic mutations, including PARP mutations. This suggests that more women than just those with a BRCA mutation would benefit from treatment with a PARP inhibitor.Read the abstract <link href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0030042">here</link><emphasize>reprinted from OCNA</emphasize>

A study from the Oregon Health &amp; Science University suggests that women who have a recurrence of ovarian cancer would benefit from PARP inhibitors, now being tested in women with hereditary ovarian cancer. The study enrolled women with non-hereditary ovarian cancer, also called sporadic ovarian cancer. The women who had a recurrence were more likely to have certain genetic mutations, including PARP mutations. This suggests that more women than just those with a BRCA mutation would benefit from treatment with a PARP inhibitor.Read the abstract <link href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0030042">here</link>
<emphasize>reprinted from OCNA</emphasize>